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Hazards for musculoskeletal disorders can be minimized

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are very common, but few people know what they are until they are suffering with pain. This document contains a list of common MSDs that can occur in people prior to entering the work-force because people use computers now for fun.

MSDs are common in office workers

The U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration defines musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) as “injuries and disorders of the soft tissues (muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints and cartilage) and nervous system.  They can affect nearly all tissues, including the nerves and tendon sheaths, and most frequently involve the arms and back.”  

Up to 85 percent of the population will suffer from musculoskeletal pain.  

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are known by many names, such as cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs).

MSDs are also called repetitive motion disorders (RMDs),  overuse syndromes,  repetitive strain injuries, and “office syndrome.”

Office syndrome infographic. Symptoms and causes.
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The Ergonomics of Neck Pain

You can reduce risk factors for the development of neck and shoulder pain. Some of the things to avoid are prolonged sitting with the neck bent forward; holding a phone between the shoulder and ear; bending the head back (looking up) for long periods.

Neck and shoulder pain are common among younger and younger people and can be caused by musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremities. Preventative measures should be taken to minimize risk factors for neck and shoulder pain before you are in pain.

The risk factors for and causes of neck and shoulder pain as well as preventative measures for the development of neck and shoulder pain found in the medical research are listed here.

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Chronic pelvic pain has two different definitions

Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) occurs in women and men. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) definition applies to women. The European Association of Urologists (EAU) revised their guidelines beginning in 2009 to include women and men in their definition of chronic pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic pain is a bladder pain syndrome that occurs in women and men. Urological pain syndromes in men include chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS).

Historically, chronic pelvic pain (CPP), was defined by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and applied to women.

In 2009, the European Association of Urology (EAU) published Guidelines on chronic pelvic pain (CPP).  Their stated objective was “to revise guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of CPP patients.”

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Hemorrhoids

This article discusses hemorrhoids, famous people throughout history with hemorrhoids, the causes and risk factors for hemorrhoids, and conditions confused with hemorrhoids and includes references from the medical literature.

Hemorrhoids and conditions that can be confused with hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are one of the most frequent problems people in westernized countries face.  There are estimates of up to 75 to 90 percent occurrence rates of hemorrhoids in the U.S. population (1, 2, 3, 4, 5).

An estimated 50 percent of those over the age of 50 years require some type of conservative or operative therapy (4). 

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Back Pain — Causes, Types, Categories, Risk Factors, Red Flags and Treatments 

“The spine affects and is affected by every movement your body makes. The way you stand, the way you sit, the way you move, the way you pick up and carry objects — all these things have the potential to help or hurt your back.”

Mary Pullig-Schatz, M.D., Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, TN

Who is at risk for back pain? 

Up to 75 percent of the population experience low back pain lasting more than one week at some point in their lives.  

Back pain in people 18-24

In a one year period, the estimate of people with an episode of back pain is about 17 percent.  Also the estimate of the people 18 to 24 years having back pain in a one year period is 13 percent.  

“The prevalence of back pain in the youngest group studied (18-24 years old) was 13 percent for females and males.”

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